Arts, Sciences, and Engineering English
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
24295 ENG 242 BLACK INTELLECTUALS AND GLOBAL CONTEXTS Spring 2017 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1025 1140 B&L 315
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
4
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
16
Total Cap     
No Cap
Cross Listed: AAS 244, AAS 444, ENG 242 (P), ENG 442
Instructors: MICHAEL J
Final Exam Schedule: B&L 315 on 0510 at 1230
Description: In this course we will consider the special contributions of black intellectuals to the culture and controversies of North America and the Atlantic world. We will consider definitions of the “intellectual” and the special demands on and requirements of artistic expression in the African diaspora. Analyses of artistic and intellectual traditions and of problems like racial identity, national belonging, artistic expression, and gender will focus our discussions. Works to be discussed may include Phyllis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Anna Cooper, W. E. B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington, Francis Harper, Ida B. Wells, Zora Hurston, George Schuyler, Franz Fanon, C. L. R. James, James Baldwin, Hortense Spillers, Maryse Condé, Spike Lee and others.
Clusters: H1POL002
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/college/eng/undergrad/index.html
Offered: Fall Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
78607 ENG 242 MASTERPIECE THEATER Spring 2017 4.0 Cancelled
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1400 1515
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
No Cap
Clusters: H1POL002
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/college/eng/undergrad/index.html
Offered: Fall Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
80126 ENG 242 THE IDEA OF AMERICA Spring 2017 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
T 1400 1640 RRLIB 362
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
5
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
18
Total Cap     
20
Cross Listed: AMS 200 (P), ENG 242, HIS 264
Instructors: RUBIN J; TAWIL E
Final Exam Schedule: RRLIB 362 on 0512 at 1600
Description: What is America? A country? A continent? A political ideal? A culture? This course traces the development of ideas about America, from its historical beginnings to our own time, from European fantasies about the New World and its possibilities to the experiences of settlers and citizens facing its realities. We will explore the competing and even contending narratives of America in a wide variety of cultural documents, from orations, sermons and political tracts to novels, poems, photographs, and films. The course is open to all interested students and required for all American Studies majors.

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
76743 ENG 242 DREAM OF THE RED CHAMBER Spring 2016 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1400 1515 B&L 269
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
3
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
11
Total Cap     
No Cap
Cross Listed: CHI 214 (P), CLT 214, ENG 242
Instructors: SCHAEFER W
Description: This course is devoted to an intensive reading of the greatest work of Chinese prose fiction, the eighteenth-century novel, Dream of the Red Chamber (Hongloumeng). We will pay close attention to the novel’s extended reflection on the relations between illusion, reality, and fabrication; its subversion of historical narrative; its construction of architectural and “natural” spaces; its intense obsession with the sensuousness of material culture; and its powerful narration of desire in early modern China. No background in Chinese literature, culture, or language assumed. All readings in English.

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
77136 ENG 242 DANGEROUS CHILDREN Spring 2016 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
TR 1525 1640 LCHAS 181
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
21
Section Cap     
No Cap
Instructors: GROSS K
Description: This course will explore a tradition of stories that center around troubled fictions of childhood, in particular works that focus on the figure of the dangerous or haunted child. The fascination of such children in these books comes from their strange joining together of innocence and knowledge, vulnerability and power—hence the often vexed nature of these children's encounters with the adult world. These stories emerge especially in Romanticism, with its re-evaluation of the nature of childhood, and its feeling for the buried or unconscious powers of the human mind more generally. They continue to grip modern writers. Readings will include William Blake, Songs of Innocence and Experience; poems by William Wordsworth; Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland; Henry James, The Turn of the Screw; J. M. Barrie, Peter and Wendy; Richard Hughes, High Wind in Jamaica; Elizabeth Bowen, The Death of the Heart; Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita; and shorter works by Kafka, Freud, and Angela Carter. Fits the post-1800 requirement.
Clusters: H1POL002
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/college/eng/courses/index.html
Offered: Fall Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
81316 ENG 242 DANGEROUS CHILDREN Fall 2017 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
TR 1400 1515 LCHAS 163
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
No Cap
Instructors: GROSS K
Description: The course will explore a tradition of stories that center around troubled fictions of childhood, in particular works focusing on the figure of the dangerous or haunted child. Such fictive children often strangely join together innocence and knowledge, vulnerability and power, seriousness and play—reasons for their vexed encounters with the adult world. These stories emerge especially in the wake of Romanticism, with its re-evaluation of the nature of childhood, and its feeling for the buried or unconscious powers of the human mind more generally. The figure of the dangerous child continues to grip modern writers. Our main texts will be Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, Carlo Collodi’s Pinocchio, Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw and What Maisie Knew, J. M. Barrie’s Peter and Wendy, Richard Hughes’s High Wind in Jamaica, Elizabeth Bowen’s The Death of the Heart, and Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita. Fits the post-1800 requirement.
Clusters: H1POL002
URL: http://www.sas.rochester.edu/eng/undergraduate/index.html
Offered: Fall

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
82077 ENG 242 History of Friendship Fall 2017 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 900 1015 RRLIB 456
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
0
Total Cap     
18
Cross Listed: ENG 242, GSW 226, GSW 426, HIS 226 (P), HIS 226W, HIS 429
Instructors: SLAUGHTER T
Description: The course is an exploration of the history of friendship focusing on the 19th century and the United States. We will consider friendships between women, between men, and cross-gender friendships; we will also discuss love letters and letters of courtship. To the extent possible, we will look at friendships among children in the years between 1820 and 1870, and between children and adults. We will read and discuss several famous friendships from that era--e. g., Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, the poet Emily Dickinson and her childhood friend and ultimately sister-in-law Susan Dickinson--and use the family correspondence from the Seward Family Archive digital humanities project as our core primary-source evidence for arriving at a historically and culturally situated definition of friendship and the nature of epistolary relationships.
Clusters: S1HIS006, S1HIS013

Eastman School of Music English
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
83752 ENG 242 LYRIC POETRY Fall 2017 3.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MWF 1135 1225 ET 412
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
20
Instructors: BALDO J
Description: 6ENG 242 (I, II-3) Lyric Poetry: A study of the major forms of lyric poetry, exploring poems from several historical periods (Renaissance, neo-classical, romantic, modern, and postmodern) and paying particular attention to modern and contemporary reinterpretations of traditional forms like the haiku, renga, ode, elegy, sonnet, ballad, sestina, pantoum, and villanelle. From time to time, we will remind ourselves of lyric poetry’s historical associations with music, and I will encourage students to explore musical settings of the poetry we read.
Clusters: H1POL002
Offered: Fall Spring

Arts, Sciences, and Engineering English
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
24891 ENG 242 AUTHORS, EDITORS, AND THE LITERARY MARKETPLACE Fall 2016 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1400 1515 MOREY 303
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
5
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
8
Total Cap     
No Cap
Cross Listed: ENG 242 (P), ENG 442
Instructors: LONDON B
Description: What is an author? This course begins with the premise that the answer to this question is anything but self-evident. Does the idea of the author as solitary genius correspond to the actual practices of ordinary writers? And does it correspond to the practice of even the “great” authors like Shakespeare? Was such an ideal ever anything but a myth? What role do editors play in the practice of authorship? Should they count as co-authors? How do market factors and modes of publication affect what and how an author writes? How has our understanding of authorship changed in a world of virtual authors and virtual texts? Looking at a wide range of examples, we will examine a number of sites of debate: collaborative authorship; ghost writing; forgeries and hoaxes; plagiarism; celebrity authorship; bestsellers; film, electronic and digital media; self- and on-demand publishing; copyright. Students will have the opportunity to do original research on topics of their own choosing.
Clusters: H1POL002
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/College/ENG/undergrad/undergraduate_courses.html
Offered: Fall Spring