Arts, Sciences, and Engineering English
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
75644 ENG 242 DREAM OF THE RED CHAMBER Spring 2014 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1400 1515 MOREY 205
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
2
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
4
Total Cap     
25
Cross Listed: CHI 214 (P), CLT 214, ENG 242
Instructors: SCHAEFER W
Description: This course is devoted to an intensive reading of the greatest work of Chinese prose fiction, the eighteenth-century novel, Dream of the Red Chamber (Hongloumeng). We will pay close attention to the novel’s extended reflection on the relations between illusion, reality, and fabrication; its subversion of historical narrative; its construction of architectural and “natural” spaces; its intense obsession with the sensuousness of material culture; and its powerful narration of desire in early modern China. No background in Chinese literature, culture, or language assumed. All readings in English.

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
77545 ENG 242 Visualizing Dante Spring 2014 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
TR 1525 1640 HYLAN 307
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
6
Total Cap     
28
Cross Listed: AH 247, CLT 254, ENG 242, IT 245 (P), REL 287
Instructors: STOCCHI-PERUC
Description: The tradition of illustrating Dante’s Divine Comedy spans over seven centuries constituting a field of study in and of itself. The twofold objective of the course is met through a seminar and a lab component. In the seminar we focus on specific instances of this tradition from the disciplinary and methodological perspectives of art history and visual analysis and at the same time interrogate the relation of text and image. What does it mean for a visual representation to illustrate, interpret, enter in a critical dialogue with, or appropriate a text? In what way do the verbal images of the text – conveyed by both metaphors and narrative – lend themselves to all the above? How can a piece of visual art provide original insight on the text while opening up a window on the motivations and concerns of the epoch in which it was produced? In the lab we research on artists and artifacts, and work on the structure, content, and usability of a Dante database currently under construction at the UR.
Clusters: H1FMS009, H1IT005, H1MLC001
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/College/mlc/

Eastman School of Music English
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
79972 ENG 242 LYRIC POETRY Spring 2014 3.0 Closed
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MWF 935 1025 ESM 209
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
21
Section Cap     
20
Instructors: BALDO J
Description: 6ENG 242 (I, II-3) Lyric Poetry: A study of the major forms of lyric poetry, exploring poems from several historical periods (Renaissance, neo-classical, romantic, modern, and postmodern) and paying particular attention to modern and contemporary reinterpretations of traditional forms like the haiku, renga, ode, elegy, sonnet, ballad, sestina, pantoum, and villanelle. From time to time, we will remind ourselves of lyric poetry’s historical associations with music, and I will encourage students to explore musical settings of the poetry we read.
Clusters: H1POL002, H1SUS001
Offered: Fall Spring

Arts, Sciences, and Engineering English
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
40312 ENG 242 IDEA OF AMERICA Fall 2014 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
T 1400 1640 RRLIB 456
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
9
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
17
Total Cap     
20
Cross Listed: AMS 200 (P), ENG 242, HIS 264
Instructors: RUBIN J; TAWIL E
Description: What is America? A country? A continent? A political ideal? A culture? This course traces the development of ideas about America, from its historical beginnings to our own time, from European fantasies about the New World and its possibilities to the experiences of settlers and citizens facing its realities. We will explore the competing and even contending narratives of America in a wide variety of cultural documents, from orations, sermons and political tracts to novels, poems, photographs, and films. The course is open to all interested students and required for all American Studies majors.
Offered: Fall

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
39285 ENG 242 IDEA OF AMERICA Fall 2013 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
R 1105 1345 RRLIB 362
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
7
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
18
Total Cap     
20
Cross Listed: AMS 200 (P), ENG 242, HIS 264
Instructors: RUBIN J; TAWIL E
Description: WHAT IS AMERICA? A country? A continent? A political ideal? A culture? This course traces the development of ideas about America, from its historical beginnings to our own time, from European fantasies about the New World and its possibilities to the experiences of settlers and citizens facing its realities. We will explore the competing and even contending narratives of America in a wide variety of cultural documents, from orations, sermons and political tracts to novels, poems, photographs, and films. The course is open to all interested students and required for all American Studies majors.
Offered: Fall

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
77921 ENG 242 POLISH AND AMERICAN POETRY Fall 2013 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
TR 1230 1345 LCHAS 160
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
3
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
5
Total Cap     
No Cap
Cross Listed: CLT 203, CLT 403, ENG 242 (P), ENG 442, LTS 201, LTS 411
Instructors: GROTZ J
Description: Former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky once described Czeslaw Milosz as "an essential American poet--perhaps even the most important living American poet." When Milosz received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1980, he had already been living in California for twenty years. Exiled from their native Poland, several major poets of the twentieth-century, such as Milosz, Zbigniew Herbert, and most recently-Adam Zagajewski-have spent long periods of time and written poetry in the United States and thereby have become an essential part of American poetry. This class will consider two aspects of this phenomenon: the ways in which contemporary American poets have read Polish poets and, conversely, the way the new generation of Polish poets have read American poetry (most notably New York School poets Frank O'Hara and John Ashbery). All readings will be in English or English translation.
Clusters: H1POL002, H1SUS001
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/College/ENG/undergrad/undergraduate_courses.html
Offered: Fall Spring