Arts, Sciences, and Engineering English
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
78512 ENG 245 AFTER BECKETT Spring 2014 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1650 1805 GAVET 301
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
13
Section Cap     
35
Total Enroll     
14
Total Cap     
35
Cross Listed: ENG 245 (P), ENG 445
Instructors: SCHOTTENFELD
Final Exam Schedule: GAVET 310 on 0509 at 1230
Description: Samuel Beckett is one of the most profound and influential voices in twentieth-century literature. He created worlds of immense fullness and desolation, extending the possibilities of drama and fiction while simultaneously stripping away the traditional narrative forms. This course will study Beckett's major works and then explore his influence, both thematically and stylistically, on such contemporary writers as J. M. Coetzee, Paul Auster, Harold Pinter, Donald Barthelme, John Banville, Lydia Davis, and others.
Clusters: H1ENG009, H1ENG012, H1SUS001
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/College/ENG/undergrad/undergraduate_courses.html
Offered: Fall Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
40356 ENG 245 LIT&THE MODRN ENVIRON IMAGIN Fall 2014 4.0 Cancelled
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1525 1640
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
No Cap
Clusters: H1ENG009, H1ENG012, H1SUS001

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
40367 ENG 245 CHEKHOV & SHORT STORY Fall 2014 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
TR 1400 1515 LCHAS 143
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
4
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
8
Total Cap     
20
Cross Listed: CLT 255C, CLT 455C, ENG 245, RST 243, RST 243W, RST 443, RUS 243 (P), RUS 243W, RUS 443
Instructors: MASLENNIKOVA
Description: The climax of Russian civic, lyric, and psychological realism in the works of Chekhov, Tolstoy, Bunin, Gorky, and others. Symbolism as a reaction to realism and as the beginning of literary modernism in Russia.
Clusters: H1RST001, H1RST002, H1RUS001, H1RUS005

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
40375 ENG 245 THE OUTSIDER IN LITERATURE Fall 2014 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
WF 900 1015 LCHAS 160
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
3
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
3
Total Cap     
No Cap
Cross Listed: ENG 245 (P), ENG 445
Instructors: TUCKER J
Description: This course uses literature to analyze social behavior, specifically processes of inclusion and exclusion. How communities are constructed, around what signs and sets of practices, and the role that exclusion plays in defining a community are topics we will explore. What does it mean to belong? To be excluded? And just how stable are these categories? Literature from a variety of traditions, historical periods, and genres will provide examples, case histories, and a vocabulary with which such social phenomena can be discussed. Texts include Beowulf, John Gardner’s Grendel, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, Seamus Heaney’s The Cure at Troy, Amin Maalouf’s In the Name of Identity, Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, Peter Shaffer’s Equus, Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own, Richard Wright’s Black Boy, and more. Course requirements include two essays, bi-weekly response papers, and class participation.
Clusters: H1ENG009, H1ENG012, H1SUS001
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/college/eng/courses/index.html
Offered: Fall Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
39194 ENG 245 SEEKING THE OTHER: SEX, RACE, MONSTROSITY BEFORE MODERNITY Fall 2013 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1400 1515 RRLIB ROBBN
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
3
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
4
Total Cap     
25
Cross Listed: ENG 245 (P), ENG 445
Instructors: HAHN T
Final Exam Schedule: RRLIB ROBBN on 1218 at 1600
Description: Contemporary notions of global identities, national spirit, axes of evil, and cosmopolitanism spring directly from encounters and explorations on both sides of 1492. Universal kinship, ethnic cleansing, world unity, and genocide mark the stories of travelers and travel-liars, pilgrims and missionaries, merchants and adventurers. We will read accounts (and study images) of the Farthest East and the Celtic Fringe, of Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Mediterranean, and of “discoveries” of New Worlds in opposite hemispheres. Narratives register difference as cannibalism, bestiality, child sacrifice, and novel sexualities; as religious miracles and mysteries or demonized Others; as marvelous and monstrous bodies that mark species limits or new possibilities for the “human.” Descriptions of first encounters from all Abrahamic faiths describe Jewish diaspora, Christian fantasies of world conquest, and the realities of Dar al-Islam. Students will write a half dozen short response papers and a final essay.
Clusters: H1ENG009, H1ENG012, H1SUS001
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/College/ENG/undergrad/undergraduate_courses.html
Offered: Fall Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
39320 ENG 245 Literature & Modern Environmental Imagination Fall 2013 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1525 1640 GRGEN 110
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
6
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
6
Total Cap     
18
Cross Listed: CAS 245 (P), ENG 245
Instructors: NADIR L
Final Exam Schedule: GRGEN 110 on 1218 at 0830
Description: Globalization, war, animal rights, mass media, consumer culture, eco-tourism, the rise of the megacity, and the conquest of indigenous peoples—these are just some of the issues raised in the selection of American environmental literary works surveyed in this course. Reading a diverse range of “green” texts, from slave narrative and nature writing to novels and political essays, we will study how writers imagine relationships to place and environment amidst accelerating social, economic, and technological change.
Clusters: H1SUS001

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
39347 ENG 245 THE MODERN NOVELLA Fall 2013 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
TR 1650 1805 MOREY 205
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
19
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
21
Total Cap     
No Cap
Cross Listed: ENG 245 (P), ENG 445
Instructors: SCHOTTENFELD
Final Exam Schedule: MOREY 205 on 1221 at 1230
Description: More broadly, a study of the gray zone between short story and novel, containing many ambiguous labels (long short story, novella, short novel). The course will interrogate various boundaries - When does a short story become a novella? - When does a novella become a novel? - and locate answers not merely in word count, but in reader experience and expectation. Because of the (relative) brevity of these in-between texts, the course will cover much stylistic and geographic ground. Author list may include: Franz Kafka, Philip Roth, Don DeLillo, Carson McCullers, Nathanael West, Gabriel García Márquez, Henry James, George Saunders, Ethan Canin, Aleksandar Hemon, William Gass, Flannery O'Connor, Cynthia Ozick, and Peter Taylor.
Clusters: H1ENG009, H1ENG012, H1SUS001
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/College/ENG/undergrad/undergraduate_courses.html
Offered: Fall Spring