Arts, Sciences, and Engineering English
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
39282 ENG 267 FOOD, MEDIA, LITERATURE Spring 2014 4.0 Closed
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1525 1640 LCHAS 161
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
6
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
16
Total Cap     
15
Cross Listed: CAS 268 (P), ENG 267, FMS 275
Instructors: NADIR L
Final Exam Schedule: LCHAS 161 on 0505 at 0830
Description: This course reframes how and what we eat. We will trace how industrial, political, and ecological processes, across the 20th and 21st centuries, construct how food appears on our plates. Topics to be studied include biotechnology, food-preservation, pesticides, fast food, processed food, genetic modification, and the organic, local, vegetarian, slow-food, and food justice movements—from the perspective of artistic, literary, and cultural texts. To capture the ways that food is represented and remixed through new media culture, course “readings” will consider not only fiction and nonfiction writing (poetry, novels, essays, journalism) but also diverse media, such as films, videos, blogs, Facebook groups, email listservs, TED Talks, celebrity-chef cookbooks, YouTube videos, and television/online programming. To study the role of the body and community in food politics, we will collaborate on food preparation and take trips off-campus to farmers’ markets, restaurants, grocery stores, and local food deserts.

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
78624 ENG 267 BAD DEVICES: MEDIA & DANGEROUS LOOKING IN FILM Spring 2014 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1400 1515 MOREY 504
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
11
Section Cap     
30
Total Enroll     
24
Total Cap     
30
Cross Listed: ENG 267 (P), ENG 467, FMS 219
Instructors: HIGLEY S
Final Exam Schedule: MOREY 504 on 0506 at 1600
Description: “Bad Devices” examines film depictions—much of it fantasy and horror--of media technology that compromises us. Whether it be the television or the Internet, the camera or the cell phone, mediated communication is depicted as treacherous in a series of movies ranging from critiques of TV--A Face in the Crowd, Quiz Show--to speculative films: The Truman Show, The Mothman Prophesies, the holodeck in Star Trek: TNG; The Matrix; Blair Witch Project; The Last Broadcast; eXistenZ; Shadow of the Vampire; Ringu/The Ring; Inland Empire; and BBC Sherlock (The Great Game and Scandal in Belgravia). Media growth has never been so rapid and impactful, the seeds of it starting mid-century and before. We revel in it, distrust it, fear and are fascinated by the way it informs us, deludes us and messes with our identity and our relationship to the world and to each other. Critical material will include, among others, texts by Walter Benjamin, Guy Debord, Jean Baudrillard, Kieren Gillen, etc.
Clusters: H1ENG002, H1ENG016, H1SUS001
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/College/ENG/undergrad/undergraduate_courses.html
Offered: Fall Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
82009 ENG 267 FOOD, MEDIA, LITERATURE Spring 2014 4.0 Closed
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1230 1345 MEL 206
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
12
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
15
Total Cap     
15
Cross Listed: CAS 268 (P), ENG 267, FMS 275
Instructors: NADIR L
Final Exam Schedule: MEL 206 on 0506 at 0830

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
78087 ENG 267 CHANGING GENRES OF EROTICA Fall 2013 4.0 Closed
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
TR 1400 1515 LCHAS 161
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
11
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
26
Total Cap     
25
Cross Listed: ENG 267 (P), ENG 467, FMS 231, WST 267, WST 467
Instructors: BLEICH D
Description: Recently the large-scale dissemination of erotic and pornographic literature and film has begun to affect the majority of the population in the West. There are two main issues in the course:1) the history of the changing genres of erotica and the social changes taking place because of its wide dissemination; and 2) the proposition that if societies were different little harm and much good would come from the inclusion of erotica in peoples reading and viewing habits: erotic materials, by removing sex from the realm of the forbidden and viewing it as a species of everyday life, can contribute to the education of both sexes and people of all sexual tastes and preferences.
Clusters: H1ENG002, H1ENG016, H1SUS001
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/College/ENG/undergrad/undergraduate_courses.html
Offered: Fall Spring