Arts, Sciences, and Engineering English
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
24356 ENG 267 FOOD, MEDIA, LITERATURE Spring 2017 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1230 1345 LCHAS 160
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
8
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
14
Total Cap     
15
Cross Listed: CAS 268 (P), ENG 267, FMS 275
Instructors: NADIR L
Restrictions: [T] Not open to seniors [A] Instructor's permission required
Description: This course studies how our eating practices are shaped by industrial, political, and ecological processes. To understand the politics, economics, and history of what appears on our plates, we cover topics such as biotechnology, food-preservation, chemicals and fertilizers, fast food, processed food, genetically modified organisms, obesity, superbugs, and the organic, local, vegetarian, slow-food, and food justice movements—primarily from the perspective of artistic, literary, and cultural texts. Course “readings” will consider not only fiction and nonfiction writing but also film, video, blogs, Facebook, Twitter, email lists, TED Talks, websites, and television/online programming. This course incorporates participatory, experiential elements with the aim of examining the role of the body and community in food consumption, including (1) collaborative food preparation and meals to bring our own personal practices into critical light, and (2) class trips to farmers’ markets, restaurants, grocery stores, etc.
Clusters: N1SUS001

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
24367 ENG 267 MEDIA SPACE Spring 2017 4.0 Cancelled
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1525 1640
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
No Cap
Restrictions: [A] Instructor's permission required
Clusters: H1ENG002, H1ENG016

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
78572 ENG 267 BAD DEVICES: MEDIA AND DANGEROUS LOOKING IN FILM Spring 2017 4.0 Cancelled
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1400 1515
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
No Cap
Clusters: H1ENG002, H1ENG016
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/college/eng/undergrad/index.html
Offered: Fall Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
78642 ENG 267 ANIMATION AND THE ARTS Spring 2017 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
TR 1525 1640 GRGEN 108
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
8
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
53
Total Cap     
No Cap
Cross Listed: AH 267, ENG 267 (P), FMS 210
Instructors: BURGES J
Description: In the past 30 years, cinema has arguably become an animated medium due to the digital turn. Whether or not you agree, animation has achieved an aesthetic foothold in the contemporary period, evidence for which can be found in the rise of Pixar, and in the extensive use of CGI in films that can only be quaintly thought of as “live action” anymore. At times, we will seek to understand the aesthetic specificity and cultural significance of animation as a moving image medium by situating it in the visual, literary, graphic, and performing arts of both the present and the past. However, our main concern will be to understand what animation is and the different forms it takes in a variety of examples from superhero series and fantasy blockbusters; celluloid, stop motion, and digital animation; experimental cinema and television cartoons to relevant myths, fables, and children’s literature; comic books, graphic novels, and literary fiction; and cultural practices such as the silhouette and puppetry.
Clusters: H1ENG002, H1ENG016
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/college/eng/undergrad/index.html
Offered: Fall Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
82176 ENG 267 IMAGE, TEXT, AND TECHNOLOGY Spring 2017 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
TR 1400 1515 HYLAN 105
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
3
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
5
Total Cap     
No Cap
Cross Listed: DSC 267, ENG 267 (P)
Instructors: HEYWORTH G
Description: Image, Text and Technology is an interdisciplinary course in the history of the book as a textual and visual medium, an artistic object, and a technology of communication. We will treat this history not merely in the classroom, but participate in it through a series of hands-on projects. Beginning with Aristotle’s insight that we think in images, we will consider writing as bound up in a theoretical relationship with seeing (aesthetics), perceiving (phenomenology, vision, cognitive science), and historically with technologies of dissemination, both analog and digital (manuscripts, printing, photography, television, the internet). We will explore the limits and conjunctions of visual and verbal media through theoretical and scientific readings in Plato, Lessing, Benjamin, Derrida, and McLuhan, and primary texts including the Bible, the Popol Vuh, and the Precepts of Ptah Hotep. This course may be taken alone or in conjunction with Digital Imaging: Transforming Real into Virtual (Digital Media Studies).
Clusters: H1ENG002, H1ENG016
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/college/eng/undergrad/index.html
Offered: Fall Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
84209 ENG 267 PHONO-GRAPHY/MUSIC & AA LIT Spring 2017 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1230 1345 MEL 218
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
7
Total Cap     
25
Cross Listed: AAS 234 (P), ENG 267, MUR 238
Instructors: FESS P
Description: This course investigates how music structured the politics and literature of race, enslavement, and citizenship for African Americans from the U.S. abolitionist movement to the early twentieth century. Even though recorded sound was only just beginning to become popular during the end of this period, music provided fertile ground from which writers, thinkers, and activists negotiated the momentous changes African Americans saw during these years. In order to develop tools by which to read for sound we will study the work of sound theorists such as Jacques Attali, Jonathan Sterne, Alexander Weheliye, and Katherine Biers. We will also examine various types of recordings including the songbook Slave Songs of the United States (1867), late-nineteenth-century cylinder and acetate recordings, and early blues and jazz recordings.
Offered: Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
80956 ENG 267 FOOD, MEDIA, LITERATURE Spring 2016 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1230 1345 LCHAS 160
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
7
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
11
Total Cap     
15
Cross Listed: CAS 268 (P), ENG 267, FMS 275
Instructors: NADIR L
Restrictions: [A] Instructor's permission required
Final Exam Schedule: LCHAS 160 on 0503 at 0830
Description: This course studies how our eating practices are shaped by industrial, political, and ecological processes. To understand the politics, economics, and history of what appears on our plates, we cover topics such as biotechnology, food-preservation, chemicals and fertilizers, fast food, processed food, genetically modified organisms, obesity, superbugs, and the organic, local, vegetarian, slow-food, and food justice movements—primarily from the perspective of artistic, literary, and cultural texts. Course “readings” will consider not only fiction and nonfiction writing but also film, video, blogs, Facebook, Twitter, email lists, TED Talks, websites, and television/online programming. This course incorporates participatory, experiential elements with the aim of examining the role of the body and community in food consumption, including (1) collaborative food preparation and meals to bring our own personal practices into critical light, and (2) class trips to farmers’ markets, restaurants, grocery stores, etc.
Clusters: N1SUS001

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
81621 ENG 267 EcoMedia: Environmental Media from Film to Smartphones Spring 2016 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
MW 1525 1640 LCHAS 181
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
5
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
14
Total Cap     
15
Cross Listed: CAS 267 (P), ENG 267, FMS 272
Instructors: NADIR L
Restrictions: [A] Instructor's permission required
Final Exam Schedule: LCHAS 181 on 0502 at 0830
Description: This course ​investigates how contemporary media shape understandings, experiences, and imagination of nature and the environment.​ ​Media​ ​rearrange planetary spaces, bringing news of global ecological destruction onto our screens, enabling us to carry “places” around in our pockets, telling us when to turn left, when to turn right. From documentary film to mobile computing devices, media have the contradictory role of creating unprecedented connectivity while generating widespread experiences of remoteness, alienation, hyper-memory, and profound amnesia. Our study will emphasize reading critical texts and putting them into dialogue with new media artifacts by creative practitioners. Topics to be studied include natural history, sustainability, environmentalism, industrialization, e-waste, media art, surveillance culture, cultural commons, time-space compression, news coverage of unnatural disasters, the politics of factory farms and amusement parks, and performance art about environmental justice.
Clusters: H1SUS001, N1SUS001