Arts, Sciences, and Engineering Anthropology
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
11261 ANT 257 CHINESE SOCIETY AFTER MAO Fall 2019 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
22
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
23
Total Cap     
25
Cross Listed: ANT 257 (P), ANT 457
Instructors: SUM C
Description: This course examines the dramatic changes that have occurred in the People’s Republic of China in the last forty years from the viewpoint of the people who lived through those changes. We will look at the implications of China’s transforming political economy for daily life and work. We will start with questioning and deconstructing some popular misunderstandings about China. We will then turn to reading about the lives and struggles of the vast but often marginalized populations, including rural inhabitants, ethnic minorities, and migrant workers. We will also discuss the present and future development of China’s global role and democratic trajectory, and the opportunities and challenges encountered by post-reform China and its ruling regime in the midst of economic transition and globalization. The course aims to introduce students—regardless of prior knowledge in East Asia and cultural anthropology—to analytical tools/vocabulary to engage in meaningful conversations about Chinese politics and society
Clusters: S1HIS010
Offered: Fall Spring

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
11448 ANT 257 CHINESE SOCIETY AFTER MAO Fall 2018 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
20
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
22
Total Cap     
25
Cross Listed: ANT 257 (P), ANT 457
Instructors: OSBURG J
Description: This course adopts an anthropological approach towards understanding the dramatic socio-cultural transformations that have followed in the wake of China’s post-Mao economic reforms. What happens when a society officially committed to economic and gender equality witnesses the rise of stark social divisions? Beginning with an historical overview of the key features of the Maoist and post-Mao periods, we will move on to examine such issues as the creation of a market economy, the rise of new social classes, rural to urban migration, changing ideologies of gender and sexuality, new attitudes towards education and work, transformations in family life, religious revival and conversion, and the influences of global popular culture and mass consumption, with an eye towards identifying both continuities and departures from the Maoist era. Throughout our discussions we will consider the implications of these changes for China’s political, social, and economic futures.
Clusters: S1HIS010
Offered: Fall Spring