Arts, Sciences, and Engineering College of Arts & Science
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
15498 CAS 268 FOOD, MEDIA, LITERATURE Spring 2017 4.0 Closed
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
6
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
15
Total Cap     
15
Cross Listed: CAS 268 (P), ENG 267, FMS 275
Instructors: NADIR L
Restrictions: [T] Not open to seniors [A] Instructor's permission required
Final Exam Schedule: LCHAS 160 on 0509 at 0830
Description: This course studies how our eating practices are shaped by industrial, political, and ecological processes. To understand the politics, economics, and history of what appears on our plates, we cover topics such as biotechnology, food-preservation, chemicals and fertilizers, fast food, processed food, genetically modified organisms, obesity, superbugs, and the organic, local, vegetarian, slow-food, and food justice movements—primarily from the perspective of artistic, literary, and cultural texts. Course “readings” will consider not only fiction and nonfiction writing but also film, video, blogs, Facebook, Twitter, email lists, TED Talks, websites, and television/online programming. This course incorporates participatory, experiential elements with the aim of examining the role of the body and community in food consumption, including (1) collaborative food preparation and meals to bring our own personal practices into critical light, and (2) class trips to farmers’ markets, restaurants, grocery stores, etc.
Clusters: N1SUS001

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
80559 CAS 268 FOOD, MEDIA, LITERATURE Spring 2016 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
2
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
11
Total Cap     
15
Cross Listed: CAS 268 (P), ENG 267, FMS 275
Instructors: NADIR L
Restrictions: [A] Instructor's permission required
Final Exam Schedule: LCHAS 160 on 0503 at 0830
Description: This course studies how our eating practices are shaped by industrial, political, and ecological processes. To understand the politics, economics, and history of what appears on our plates, we cover topics such as biotechnology, food-preservation, chemicals and fertilizers, fast food, processed food, genetically modified organisms, obesity, superbugs, and the organic, local, vegetarian, slow-food, and food justice movements—primarily from the perspective of artistic, literary, and cultural texts. Course “readings” will consider not only fiction and nonfiction writing but also film, video, blogs, Facebook, Twitter, email lists, TED Talks, websites, and television/online programming. This course incorporates participatory, experiential elements with the aim of examining the role of the body and community in food consumption, including (1) collaborative food preparation and meals to bring our own personal practices into critical light, and (2) class trips to farmers’ markets, restaurants, grocery stores, etc.
Clusters: N1SUS001

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
18996 CAS 268 FOOD, MEDIA, LITERATURE Spring 2015 4.0 Cancelled
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
No Cap

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
18958 CAS 268 FOOD, MEDIA, LITERATURE Spring 2014 4.0 Closed
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
2
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
16
Total Cap     
15
Cross Listed: CAS 268 (P), ENG 267, FMS 275
Instructors: NADIR L
Final Exam Schedule: LCHAS 161 on 0505 at 0830
Description: This course reframes how and what we eat. We will trace how industrial, political, and ecological processes, across the 20th and 21st centuries, construct how food appears on our plates. Topics to be studied include biotechnology, food-preservation, pesticides, fast food, processed food, genetic modification, and the organic, local, vegetarian, slow-food, and food justice movements—from the perspective of artistic, literary, and cultural texts. To capture the ways that food is represented and remixed through new media culture, course “readings” will consider not only fiction and nonfiction writing (poetry, novels, essays, journalism) but also diverse media, such as films, videos, blogs, Facebook groups, email listservs, TED Talks, celebrity-chef cookbooks, YouTube videos, and television/online programming. To study the role of the body and community in food politics, we will collaborate on food preparation and take trips off-campus to farmers’ markets, restaurants, grocery stores, and local food deserts.

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
81997 CAS 268 FOOD, MEDIA, LITERATURE Spring 2014 4.0 Closed
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
1
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
15
Total Cap     
15
Cross Listed: CAS 268 (P), ENG 267, FMS 275
Instructors: NADIR L
Final Exam Schedule: MEL 206 on 0506 at 0830

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
82688 CAS 268 FOOD, MEDIA, LITERATURE Fall 2015 4.0 Cancelled
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
No Cap
Clusters: N1SUS001

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
82697 CAS 268 FOOD, MEDIA, LITERATURE Fall 2015 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
2
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
11
Total Cap     
15
Cross Listed: CAS 268 (P), ENG 267, FMS 275
Instructors: NADIR L
Restrictions: [A] Instructor's permission required
Final Exam Schedule: GRGEN 110 on 1216 at 0830
Description: This course studies how our eating practices are shaped by industrial, political, and ecological processes. To understand the politics, economics, and history of what appears on our plates, we cover topics such as biotechnology, food-preservation, chemicals and fertilizers, fast food, processed food, genetically modified organisms, obesity, superbugs, and the organic, local, vegetarian, slow-food, and food justice movements—primarily from the perspective of artistic, literary, and cultural texts. Course “readings” will consider not only fiction and nonfiction writing but also film, video, blogs, Facebook, Twitter, email lists, TED Talks, websites, and television/online programming. This course incorporates participatory, experiential elements with the aim of examining the role of the body and community in food consumption, including (1) collaborative food preparation and meals to bring our own personal practices into critical light, and (2) class trips to farmers’ markets, restaurants, grocery stores, etc.
Clusters: N1SUS001