Arts, Sciences, and Engineering English
Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-132781 ENGL 112-2 Classical & Scriptural Backgrounds Fall 2022 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
MW 1150 1305 Lechase Room 161 08/31/2022 12/22/2022
Enrollment: Enrolled     
18
Capacity     
0
Co-Located: CLST 140-1, ENGL 112-2 (P), RELC 140-1
Instructors: Steven Rozenski
Description: Homer, Virgil, and Ovid. Greek tragedy and comedy: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes. The Hebrew Bible -- Abraham and Isaac, Moses and Pharaoh, Esther and Judith -- and Christianity's New Testament. The two great traditions studied in this introductory course -- classical and Biblical -- have been pondered by generations of writers and artists for thousands of years. A great deal of literary history is the story of intricately rewriting and adapting the core texts of these traditions; it has been said that the European philosophical tradition is a series of footnotes to Plato. While doing justice to any one of these authors or traditions in a single semester would be a challenge, the goal of this class is to read as much as possible of the classical and scriptural tradition in the short time we have, giving you a solid introduction to some of the key stories and ideas that have generated so much thought, conflict, and human creativity over the past two dozen centuries. First-years welcome! . 
Offered: Fall Spring Summer

Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-111969 ENGL 112-2 Classical & Scriptural Backgrounds Fall 2021 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
MW 1150 1305 Lechase Room 161 08/25/2021 12/17/2021
Enrollment: Enrolled     
17
Capacity     
0
Co-Located: CLST 140-1, ENGL 112-2 (P), RELC 140-1
Instructors: Thomas Hahn
Description: This course addresses the Big Questions: Love, Death, War, Sex, Law, and more besides. We’ll come to our readings through myth and history, art and philosophy, and a series of broad conceptual frameworks. Above all, however, this is a course in literary appreciation and influence: we will read extensively in Homer and Virgil, in dialogues by Plato, in a broad selection of Greek tragedy (and one comedy!), in a generous selection from Hebrew and Christian scriptures. Our aim will be to encounter these as challenging, imaginative, absorbing, and enduring attempts to confront, articulate, and share the possibilities of life. We will try to do justice to these texts in their own distinctive terms, but we will strive as well to see why readers before us have prized them so highly for thousands of years, and how we are to make sense of them in the 21st century. The readings are astonishingly rich and rewarding, and we will do our best to live up to them within the limits of a semester's work. First years welcome! 
Offered: Fall Spring Summer