Arts, Sciences, and Engineering English
Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-132749 ENGL 113-1 British Literature I Fall 2022 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
TR 1400 1515 Harkness Room 210 08/31/2022 12/22/2022
Enrollment: Enrolled     
18
Capacity     
0
Instructors: Sarah Higley
Description: This course samples some of the most prominent and controversial English Literature from King Alfred’s educational reform of a broken, 9th-century Wessex to Mary Wollstonecraft's 18th-century demand for the education reform of women. England endured powerful socio-political and scientific earthquakes: invasion, linguistic change, revolt, regicide, religious war, technical innovation and colonization. Spanning Anglo-Saxon and later Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and Enlightenment eras, it gives students not only a sense of the material, philosophical and cultural changes Britain underwent in its contact with other peoples inside and outside its island, but a wide choice for more concentrated study of specific English periods and writers: Beowulf, elegiac Old-English, Middle-English Romances and Breton Lais, satiric Chaucer, the Gawain Poet, Arthurian Malory, Shakespeare’s Lear, thundering Milton, sensuous Donne, spiritual Herbert, outraged Behn, parodic Pope, Swift’s Gulliver, revolutionary Payne. 
Offered: Fall

Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-112007 ENGL 113-1 British Literature I Fall 2021 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
TR 1400 1515 Harkness Room 210 08/25/2021 12/17/2021
Enrollment: Enrolled     
26
Capacity     
0
Instructors: Steven Rozenski
Description: The first thousand years of English literary history is a story of invasions, linguistic changes, cultural translations, and technological advances. It is also a period that saw major revolts, a violent change in the dominant religion, theatrical traditions still admired today, a Civil War (ending with the beheading of the king), and the establishment of English-speaking colonies around the world. In this course we will race through these centuries, exploring the literary implications of these historical events as bards, poets, dramatists, nuns, and mystics produce one of the most fascinating bodies of literature in any language. We will read several of the most important and enduring monuments of early English literature: Beowulf, some of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus, poems by Donne and Herbert, and portions of Milton’s epic Paradise Lost, as well as some lesser-known works. Active and involved reading and discussion will be critical; the course is open to all. 
Offered: Fall