Arts, Sciences, and Engineering English
Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-132762 ENGL 200-1 History of the English Language Fall 2022 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
TR 1105 1220 Bausch & Lomb Room 270 08/31/2022 12/22/2022
Enrollment: Enrolled     
11
Capacity     
0
Co-Located: ENGL 200-1 (P), ENGL 400-1, LING 206-1, LING 406-1
Instructors: Sarah Higley
Description: English is a banquet of words. Inflicted by invasions and adaptations it remained English. Brought to Britain by Germanic tribes in the 5th century, it was matured by violent and peaceful contact with other peoples and ideas. Few other languages are so accepting of neologism, so humongous in vocabulary, so malleable of construction. We’ll peruse texts from Old, Middle and Modern English and watch it grow from a Teutonic tongue to the powerful, ductile, and eclectic instrument it is today, spreading to other continents, colonizing and absorbing. We’ll peruse linguistic Angst and jouissance by King Alfred, Aelfric, Robert of Gloucester, Chaucer, Caxton, Mulcaster, Shakespeare, Swift, Johnson, Webster, Orwell and others who praise or blame our shifty English. We’ll grok urban dialects, vernaculars, slang, texting, gender. Is it “based on” or “based off of”? “lie” or “lay”? What’s the deal with register? Vernacular vs. high-falutin’ “academic” English? Are you down with this? Grads welcome!

Offered: Fall Spring Summer

Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-111990 ENGL 200-1 History of the English Language Fall 2021 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
TR 1105 1220 Bausch & Lomb Room 270 08/25/2021 12/17/2021
Enrollment: Enrolled     
26
Capacity     
35
Co-Located: ENGL 200-1 (P), ENGL 400-1, LING 206-1, LING 406-1
Instructors: Steven Rozenski
Description: All languages change over time, often in predictable patterns. Where did today’s standard English come from, and how is our sense of that standard tied to assumptions about race, class, gender, and nationality? To find out, we will begin roughly 5,000 years ago, studying the common ancestor of languages as different as English, Hindi, and Polish: Proto-Indo-European. We will learn about the prehistoric roots of English, then turn to the earliest written evidence of it: “Anglo-Saxon” or “Old English,” ca. 600-1100.The language was transformed in the wake of the Norman Invasion of 1066, as English became lower in status than both Anglo-Norman French and Latin for a few centuries. Next, we will learn about the growth of English, and its changes, in the age of Chaucer (Middle English) and Shakespeare (Early Modern English). Finally, we will explore processes of standardization, hybridization, and diffusion in the complex effects of English’s spread across the globe over the course of the past 450 years.

Offered: Fall Spring Summer