Arts, Sciences, and Engineering English
Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-176512 ENGL 210-01 Shakespeare Fall 2024 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
Groveland Correctional Facility, Sonyea, NY On-Site 08/26/2024 12/18/2024
Enrollment: Enrolled     
0
Capacity     
30
Instructors: Jonathan Shelley
Delivery Mode: In-Person
Description: Readings of a selection of Shakespeare's plays.
Offered: Fall Spring Summer

Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-178895 ENGL 210-1 Shakespeare Fall 2024 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
MW 200 PM 315 PM Lechase Room 181 08/26/2024 12/18/2024
Enrollment: Enrolled     
11
Capacity     
25
Instructors: Rosemary Kegl
Delivery Mode: In-Person
Description: This class explores the full range of Shakespeare's theater, including examples of comedies, history plays, tragedies, and “romances.” We approach the plays from many angles, looking at their stark and extravagant language; their invention of complex conflicted human characters; their self-conscious references to contemporary stage practices; and their meditations on death, love, politics, power, and revenge. We learn about the literary and theatrical conventions that would have been second nature to Shakespeare and his audience over 400 years ago and consider how Renaissance stage practices might help us to better understand his plays and better appreciate why Renaissance audiences found them so compelling. When possible, we consult video of recent staged productions. This course is appropriate for all students, from those in their first semester at the university to senior English majors. No restrictions or prerequisites; all are welcome. It fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for the English major and satisfies a requirement in two English Clusters (Great Books, Great Authors; Plays, Playwrights, and Theater).
Offered: Fall Spring Summer

Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-155756 ENGL 210-1 Shakespeare Fall 2023 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
MW 1230 PM 145 PM Hylan Building Room 305 08/30/2023 12/22/2023
Enrollment: Enrolled     
13
Capacity     
No Cap
Instructors: Kenneth Gross
Delivery Mode: In-Person
Restrictions: Not open to First Year students (in the Class of 2027)
Description: This course will explore the Shakespeare’s diverse theatrical worlds, their dramatic inventiveness, their fierce sense of play, their psychological complexiy, their often wild flights of language, their fascination with magic and madness, with hidden things, and with the processes of time.  We’ll look at how Shakespeare’s plays dramatize the shifting dynamics of love and hatred, politics and war, of commerce, justice, and crime. We’ll also be thinking about how the plays probe Shakespeare’s own theatrical practice, his fascination with disguise and performance, his ambivalence about the powers of both actors and audiences. Readings will include plays from early to late in Shakespeare’s career, comedies, history plays, tragedies, and “romances.” This course fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for the English major. Applicable English clusters: Great Books, Great Authors; Plays, Playwrights, and Theater.  Freshman not admitted without permission of the instructor.  
Offered: Fall Spring Summer

Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-132764 ENGL 210-1 Shakespeare Fall 2022 4.0 - 0.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
MW 1230 PM 145 PM Hylan Building Room 305 08/31/2022 12/22/2022
Enrollment: Enrolled     
14
Capacity     
No Cap
Co-Located: ENGL 210-1 (P), ENGL 410-1
Instructors: Rosemary Kegl
Description: This class explores the full range of Shakespeare's theater, including examples of comedies, history plays, tragedies, and “romances.” We approach the plays from many angles, looking at their stark and extravagant language; their invention of complex conflicted human characters; their self-conscious references to contemporary stage practices; and their meditations on death, love, politics, power, and revenge. We learn about the literary and theatrical conventions that would have been second nature to Shakespeare and his audience 400 years ago, and consider how Renaissance stage practices might help us to better understand his plays and better appreciate why Renaissance audiences found them so compelling. When possible we consult video of recent staged productions. This course is appropriate for all students, from those in their first semester at the university to senior English majors. It fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for the English major and two English Clusters (Great Books, Great Authors; Plays, Playwrights, and Theater).
Offered: Fall Spring Summer