Arts, Sciences, and Engineering History
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
84706 HIS 243 TOWARD A SOCIAL LITERATURE: THE COEVOLUTION OF LITERATURE AND SOCIETY IN LATE QING CHINA (READINGS IN TRANSLATION) Spring 2017 4.0 Cancelled
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
0
Section Cap     
No Cap
Clusters: S1HIS004, S1HIS010, S1HIS018

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
42092 HIS 243 DANGEROUS TEXTS Fall 2011 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
4
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
18
Total Cap     
No Cap
Cross Listed: CLT 265E, HIS 243, HIS 243W, RST 289, RST 289W, RUS 289 (P), RUS 289W
Instructors: PARTHE K
Description: When modern Russian literature began to evolve in the mid-1600s, the printed or written text was immediately seen as a potential danger to the power of Church and State. In this course we will examine dangerous texts' from the 17th century to the present to see what aspects of texts and their authors were seen as threats and how these threats were dealt with. We will also see the ways in which writers did indeed perceive themselves as a second government' and how this changed the way they wrote. The reading list will include works by: Avvakum, Radishchev, Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Babel, Mayakovsky, Mandelstam, Pasternak, Yevtushenko, Solzhenitsyn, Voinovich, Grossman, and Sinyavsky/Tertz. The goal of this course is to arrive at an understanding of the unique role played by literature in Russian history. In English.
Clusters: H1MLC002, H1RST001, H1RST002, H1RUS001, H1RUS005, S1HIS016, S1RST001
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/college/MLC/

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
42106 HIS 243W DANGEROUS TEXTS Fall 2011 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
4
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
18
Total Cap     
No Cap
Cross Listed: CLT 265E, HIS 243, HIS 243W, RST 289, RST 289W, RUS 289 (P), RUS 289W
Instructors: PARTHE K
Description: When modern Russian literature began to evolve in the mid-1600s, the printed or written text was immediately seen as a potential danger to the power of Church and State. In this course we will examine dangerous texts' from the 17th century to the present to see what aspects of texts and their authors were seen as threats and how these threats were dealt with. We will also see the ways in which writers did indeed perceive themselves as a second government' and how this changed the way they wrote. The reading list will include works by: Avvakum, Radishchev, Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Babel, Mayakovsky, Mandelstam, Pasternak, Yevtushenko, Solzhenitsyn, Voinovich, Grossman, and Sinyavsky/Tertz. The goal of this course is to arrive at an understanding of the unique role played by literature in Russian history. In English.
Clusters: H1MLC002, H1RST001, H1RST002, H1RUS001, H1RUS005, S1HIS016, S1RST001
URL: http://www.rochester.edu/college/MLC/