Arts, Sciences, and Engineering Modern Languages & Cultures - Japanese
CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
29193 JPN 211 FICTIONS OF INTERIORITY: MODERN JAPANESE LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION Fall 2016 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
4
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
6
Total Cap     
20
Cross Listed: CLT 277, CLT 477, JPN 211 (P), JPN 211W, JPN 411
Instructors: HOLLOWAY D
Description: This course will consider modern Japanese literature through a chronological look at a variety of novels, short stories, and essays from the late 19th century to present day. While we will devote considerable time to the canonical writings of Natsume Sôseki, Tanizaki Jun’ichirô, Ôe Kenzaburô, and Murakami Haruki—authors who are in many ways synonymous with Japanese literature itself—equal attention will be given to writers yet under-appreciated and under-analyzed. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will study not only the texts and authors, but also issues of gender, race, psychology, sexuality, morality, and history as they relate to the Japanese literary corpus. A selection of shorter fiction and a few novels will be available in English translation and students need not be familiar with Japanese.

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
29208 JPN 211W FICTIONS OF INTERIORITY: MODERN JAPANESE LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION Fall 2016 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
2
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
6
Total Cap     
20
Cross Listed: CLT 277, CLT 477, JPN 211 (P), JPN 211W, JPN 411
Instructors: HOLLOWAY D
Description: This course will consider modern Japanese literature through a chronological look at a variety of novels, short stories, and essays from the late 19th century to present day. While we will devote considerable time to the canonical writings of Natsume Sôseki, Tanizaki Jun’ichirô, Ôe Kenzaburô, and Murakami Haruki—authors who are in many ways synonymous with Japanese literature itself—equal attention will be given to writers yet under-appreciated and under-analyzed. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will study not only the texts and authors, but also issues of gender, race, psychology, sexuality, morality, and history as they relate to the Japanese literary corpus. A selection of shorter fiction and a few novels will be available in English translation and students need not be familiar with Japanese.

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
83788 JPN 211 Modern Japanese Literature in Translation Fall 2015 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
5
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
7
Total Cap     
25
Cross Listed: CLT 277, CLT 477, JPN 211 (P), JPN 211W, JPN 411
Instructors: HOLLOWAY D
Description: This course will consider modern Japanese literature through a chronological look at a variety of novels, short stories, and essays from the late 19th century to present day. While we will devote considerable time to the canonical writings of Natsume Sôseki, Tanizaki Jun’ichirô, Ôe Kenzaburô, and Murakami Haruki—authors who are in many ways synonymous with Japanese literature itself—equal attention will be given to writers yet under-appreciated and under-analyzed. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will study not only the texts and authors, but also issues of gender, race, psychology, sexuality, morality, and history as they relate to the Japanese literary corpus. A selection of shorter fiction and a few novels will be available in English translation and students need not be familiar with Japanese.

CRN Course Course Title Term Credits Status
84476 JPN 211W Modern Japanese Literature in Translation Fall 2015 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Building Room
Enrollment: Section Enroll     
1
Section Cap     
No Cap
Total Enroll     
7
Total Cap     
25
Cross Listed: CLT 277, CLT 477, JPN 211 (P), JPN 211W, JPN 411
Instructors: HOLLOWAY D
Description: This course will consider modern Japanese literature through a chronological look at a variety of novels, short stories, and essays from the late 19th century to present day. While we will devote considerable time to the canonical writings of Natsume Sôseki, Tanizaki Jun’ichirô, Ôe Kenzaburô, and Murakami Haruki—authors who are in many ways synonymous with Japanese literature itself—equal attention will be given to writers yet under-appreciated and under-analyzed. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will study not only the texts and authors, but also issues of gender, race, psychology, sexuality, morality, and history as they relate to the Japanese literary corpus. A selection of shorter fiction and a few novels will be available in English translation and students need not be familiar with Japanese.