Arts, Sciences, and Engineering Philosophy
Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-165669 PHIL 110-1 Introductory Logic Spring 2024 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
MW 900 AM 1015 AM Meliora Room 221 01/17/2024 05/11/2024
Enrollment: Enrolled     
54
Capacity     
80
Instructors: Paul Audi
Delivery Mode: In-Person
Description: Symbolic logic through first-order quantification theory. Skill in deductive inference is strengthened through construction of proofs and other methods of a rigorously defined artificial language.
Offered: Fall Spring Summer

Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-143487 PHIL 110-1 Introductory Logic Spring 2023 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
TR 325 PM 440 PM Goergen Hall Room 108 01/11/2023 05/06/2023
Enrollment: Enrolled     
58
Capacity     
80
Instructors: Mark Povich
Delivery Mode: In-Person
Description: Symbolic logic through first-order quantification theory. Skill in deductive inference is strengthened through construction of proofs and other methods of a rigorously defined artificial language.
Offered: Fall Spring Summer

Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-175743 PHIL 110-01 Introductory Logic Fall 2024 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
MW 325 PM 440 PM Harkness Room 115 08/26/2024 12/18/2024
Enrollment: Enrolled     
40
Capacity     
80
Instructors: Mark Povich
Delivery Mode: In-Person
Description: Logic is the study of valid forms of argument. This course is an introduction to symbolic logic, a modern theory of logic that involves the construction of an artificial symbolic language within which the logical forms of sentences can be expressed and the validity of arguments can be proven. Students will learn two logical systems, Sentence Logic and Predicate Logic. In addition to translating English arguments into symbolic form, and constructing interpretations to demonstrate the invalidity of arguments, students will also learn how to prove that an argument is valid using a set of rigorously defined implication rules for each logical system.
Offered: Fall Spring Summer

Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-154872 PHIL 110-1 Introductory Logic Fall 2023 4.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
MW 325 PM 440 PM Harkness Room 115 08/30/2023 12/22/2023
Enrollment: Enrolled     
77
Capacity     
85
Instructors: Mark Povich
Delivery Mode: In-Person
Restrictions: Instructor permission is required for this course. Use the “Request Course Section Prerequisite Override” task found on your academics dashboard under the Planning & Registration section to request this permission.
Description: Logic is the study of valid forms of argument. This course is an introduction to symbolic logic, a modern theory of logic that involves the construction of an artificial symbolic language within which the logical forms of sentences can be expressed and the validity of arguments can be proven. Students will learn two logical systems, Sentence Logic and Predicate Logic. In addition to translating English arguments into symbolic form, and constructing interpretations to demonstrate the invalidity of arguments, students will also learn how to prove that an argument is valid using a set of rigorously defined implication rules for each logical system.
Offered: Fall Spring Summer

Course Section Listing Course Course Title Term Credits Status
COURSE_SECTION-3-133699 PHIL 110-1 Introductory Logic Fall 2022 4.0 - 0.0 Open
Schedule:
Day Begin End Location Start Date End Date
MW 325 PM 440 PM Harkness Room 115 08/31/2022 12/22/2022
Enrollment: Enrolled     
70
Capacity     
80
Instructors: Mark Povich
Description: Logic is the study of valid forms of argument. This course is an introduction to symbolic logic, a modern theory of logic that involves the construction of an artificial symbolic language within which the logical forms of sentences can be expressed and the validity of arguments can be proven. Students will learn two logical systems, Sentence Logic and Predicate Logic. In addition to translating English arguments into symbolic form, and constructing interpretations to demonstrate the invalidity of arguments, students will also learn how to prove that an argument is valid using a set of rigorously defined implication rules for each logical system.
Offered: Fall Spring Summer